Tuesday, 15 September 2020

Clean Teeth: How to Clean Your Teeth for a Healthy Mouth

The best way to keep your teeth, gums, and mouth in good health is through regular and effective teeth cleaning. In addition to your regular oral hygiene routine, most dental professionals recommend professional teeth cleaning. Not only will good teeth cleaning keep you in good oral health and hygiene, it will also help keep your mouth feeling fresh, prevent bad breath, and can help keep your teeth white and bright.

Brushing for Clean Teeth
Brushing your teeth is the most important and effective method for teeth cleaning. Most dentists recommend you brush at least twice a day, but brushing after every meal is even better. Whether you choose electric or manual, select a toothbrush that allows you to easily clean all surfaces and in hard to reach areas. And don't forget to replace your toothbrush every 3-4 months.
  • Picking a Toothbrush: Make sure your toothbrush fits your mouth. It’s easier to achieve clean teeth if you aren’t using a brush that’s too big. If you have a small mouth, you may find it easier to clean teeth by using a toothbrush with a compact head instead of a full-sized head. Some people find that electric toothbrushes make it easier to spend the dentist-recommended two minutes on teeth cleaning. Oral-B Vitality Toothbrushes provide thorough teeth cleaning and help to remove plaque and surface stains.
  • Picking a Toothpaste: Crest Pro-Health Toothpaste is available in several varieties (Clean Mint, Smooth Peppermint, Whitening Power, Sensitive & Enamel Shield). All types of Crest Toothpaste help protect against tooth sensitivity and help fight cavities, tartar, plaque, gingivitis, stains and bad breath.
  • Proper Brushing Technique: You can maximize clean teeth by using the most effective techniques for teeth brushing. Hold your toothbrush at approximately a 45-degree angle to the teeth you are brushing. Use small strokes and brush your teeth in sections. Don’t forget to go all the way behind your last tooth on each side. Use small, tooth-sized strokes to brush the surface of each tooth, rather than large, sweeping strokes. Cleaning teeth includes cleaning all three sides—front, back, and top of the chewing surface.
Flossing for Clean Teeth
  • Picking Floss: A thorough teeth cleaning routine includes daily flossing. Oral-B Glide Deep Clean Floss, slides easily between the teeth to remove food particles and reduce the daily buildup of plaque and bacteria on the teeth.
  • Proper Flossing Technique: Flossing is an essential part of teeth cleaning. You should floss regularly to remove food particles from in between your teeth. This can help reduce plaque and tartar build-up between teeth. If you have trouble sliding floss between your teeth, try waxed floss or wide floss. The American Dental Association recommends using about 18 inches of floss, so you have a clean piece of floss to use on each tooth in the cleaning teeth process. Curve the floss into a C-shape as you slide it up and down along the side of each tooth. Don’t forget to floss the back sides of your back teeth on both the left and right of the upper and lower teeth. 
Rinsing for Clean Teeth
  • Picking a Mouthwash: Crest Pro-Health Multi-Protection Mouthwash boosts your teeth cleaning routine with additional germ-killing and plaque-preventing properties.
  • Proper Rinsing Technique: Mouthwash is a great method for teeth cleaning and also leaves your mouth feeling fresh and clean. If you don’t like the burning sensation you get from alcohol-based rinses, look for formulas that are made without alcohol.
Get a Professional Teeth Cleaning
The happy, healthy mouth feeling you get after a good teeth cleaning is invaluable. Visiting a dental professional at least twice a year is an important part of your oral hygiene regimen. Professional teeth cleaning removes the tartar you just can’t get to at home, and regular exams will ensure your teeth and mouth are in good health. After cleaning teeth, a dentist will examine your mouth for signs of problems including:
  • Tooth loss: Cleaning teeth professionally helps keep them in good condition to promote better chewing and swallowing.
  • Gum disease: Gum disease can be avoided or caught early if a dentist sees problems while cleaning teeth.
  • Dental damage: You may not notice if you have broken fillings or damaged crowns, but a regular dental visit can identify these problems and fix them before they become serious enough to require surgery or tooth removal.
  • Oral cancer: Mouth cancer is usually treatable if diagnosed early, and a dentist can screen for oral cancer during a visit for cleaning teeth. 
How to Maintain Clean Teeth
In addition to following a complete oral care routine, you can support your cleaning teeth efforts by avoiding cigarettes and other tobacco products, eating healthy, and visiting a dental professional regularly. Keep these other tips in mind to maintain clean teeth:
  • Rinse away stains: if you can’t brush your teeth after consuming food or beverages that may stain your teeth, preserve clean teeth by rinsing your mouth with water or a mouthwash.
  • Quit smoking: Smoking is one of the top factors that undermines clean teeth. You can go a long way toward having a healthy mouth if you avoid tobacco products. That includes not only cigarettes, but cigars, pipes, and chewing tobacco (chew/dip). If you use tobacco products, it’s not too late to have a healthy mouth if you quit, or at least cut back. Studies have shown that smoking may contribute to gum disease by getting in the way when normal gum tissue cells try to do their job of maintaining a healthy mouth.
  • Eat right: Eating a balanced diet helps promote a healthy mouth, healthy teeth, and healthy gums. The American Dental Association recommends keeping between-meal snacks to a minimum to promote a healthy mouth. If you do need a snack, some healthy mouth choices include raw veggies, plain yogurt, cheese, or a piece of fruit, such as an apple or pear.
Benefits of Good Oral Health
Keeping a healthy smile is one of many benefits associated with teeth cleaning. If you keep your teeth and mouth healthy, you are sure to appreciate the following important benefits.
  • Good Oral Health: Regular teeth cleaning will keep your mouth and body healthy. Good oral hygiene can prevent plaque build-up, which can lead to gum disease. Numerous studies have suggested a correlation between poor oral hygiene, gum disease, and heart disease, so teeth cleaning is an important way to keep your entire body healthy.
  • Better Breath: Want to get a little closer? Regular teeth cleaning with any fluoride toothpaste can help freshen your breath. For a better breath bonus, choose mint toothpaste, and don’t forget to brush your tongue.
  • Brighter Smile: No one likes to have yellow teeth and an unsightly smile. Removing surface stains with daily teeth cleaning helps your teeth look brighter. Having a whiter smile helps improve your overall appearance, especially since your smile is an important part of making a good first impression.
  • Confidence: When you look great, you feel great. Flashing a bright, white smile after a good teeth cleaning will give you a new sense of self-confidence that is sure to show. Studies have shown that a bright, healthy smile gives you more confidence in both personal and professional settings.
  • Save Money: Following a regular teeth cleaning routine can eventually help you avoid costly dental visits to manage severe gum disease or tooth decay.
So, the next time you consider putting off your regular teeth cleaning for another month, remember all of this important information and think again before picking up the phone. You’ll be glad to have a happier mouth and smile once you’ve had a good teeth cleaning.
 
The above article is from crest.com

Sheboygan Dental Care
Robert W. Schoenenberger, DDS
2202 Indiana Avenue
Sheboygan, WI 53081
(920) 452-8042
DentistSheboygan.com

Sunday, 6 September 2020

How Long Do Sealants Last And How To Wear Them Well

Even someone with a fastidious dental hygiene routine can be at risk for cavities. Certain people are simply more prone to dental caries due to the shape and structure of their teeth – not because they don't brush regularly. If your dentist notices you (or someone in your family) is prone to advanced decay despite good oral hygiene, he or she may suggest using dental sealants to help keep the teeth healthy.

Of course, concerns are normal: How long do sealants last? Will the application hurt? Here's a little more about why dental sealants may be a great option for a cavitiy-prone individual.

Why Dental Sealants?

Dentists don't suggest sealants to all of their patients. Rather, they're usually reserved for individuals who are especially prone to cavities, such as teens and young kids – including those who still have baby teeth. Sealants are designed to fill the deep pits and grooves of your molars, which are uniquely susceptible to caries because they're known to trap food particles in these areas of the teeth. When bacteria become trapped in this way, it's often a recipe for cavities, so the sealants protect the tooth from caries altogether.

Applying sealants before decay starts, as noted by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), allows the sealant to block the area of bacteria and food particles from attaching to the surface of the teeth.

Will They Hurt?

It's understandable to be nervous about a dental procedure with which you have no prior experience. But dental sealants are virtually painless. The majority of them are made with liquid resin, which is then brushed onto the teeth so it can harden. The process only takes a few minutes, including application and drying. In fact, the procedure may be on offer in the dental center of some schools.

Once applied, the resin dries into a hard, plastic-like material in just a few seconds or when using a light to cure the sealant material. The material is invisible and won't feel any different than the surfaces of your natural teeth.

How Long Do Sealants Last? Can I Extend Their Wear?

Once your sealants have been applied, the NIDCR estimates they can last up to 10 years with proper care. You won't have to have them removed; instead, sealants gradually wear away over time, allowing you to receive new sealants as needed. Nonetheless, their hardened plastic material holds up remarkably well as long as you avoid behavior that puts undue stress on your teeth – such as using your teeth to open tough food packaging.

Once your sealants have been applied, your dentist will check on them each time you come in for a cleaning. He or she can even reapply if they seem to be wearing faster than usual, just to make sure your teeth are protected from the bacteria that can calcify into tartar when you're not in the dentist's chair.

Keep in mind sealants aren't the only way to ward off cavities, and are definitely not a substitute for regular oral care. If you or your child is especially prone to cavities, use products such as Colgate® Cavity Protection, which contains sodium monofluorophosphate fluoride – proven to protect teeth from the common cavity.

If you're wondering if dental sealants are the right choice for you or your child, ask your dentist about them during your next checkup. Provided you're the right type of candidate, sealants may be an excellent solution for warding off cavities and keeping your smile healthy.

The above article is from colgate.com

Sheboygan Dental Care
Robert W. Schoenenberger, DDS
2202 Indiana Avenue
Sheboygan, WI 53081
(920) 452-8042
DentistSheboygan.com

Monday, 24 August 2020

Diastema (Gap Between Teeth)

Reviewed by the Faculty of
Columbia University College of Dental Medicine
What Is It?
A diastema is a space or gap between two teeth. It appears most often between the two upper front teeth. However, gaps can occur between any two teeth.

A mismatch between the size of the jaw bones and the size of the teeth can cause either extra space between teeth or crowding of teeth. If the teeth are too small for the jaw bone, spaces between the teeth will occur. If the teeth are too big for the jaw, teeth will be crowded.

Spaces develop for a few other reasons as well.

Sometimes some teeth are missing or undersized. This happens most often with the upper lateral incisors (the teeth next to the two upper front teeth). That can cause the upper central incisors to develop a space.

A diastema also can be caused by an oversized labial frenum. The labial frenum is the piece of tissue that normally extends from the inside of your upper lip to the gum just above your two upper front teeth. In some situations, the labial frenum continues to grow and passes between the two front teeth. If this happens, it blocks the natural closing of the space between these teeth.

Habits can also lead to gaps between the teeth. Thumb sucking tends to pull the front teeth forward, creating gaps.

Spaces can develop from an incorrect swallowing reflex. For most people, the tongue presses against the roof of the mouth (palate) during swallowing. Some people develop a different reflex known as a tongue thrust. When they swallow, the tongue presses against the front teeth. Over time the pressure will push the front teeth forward. This can cause spaces to develop.

Periodontal (gum) disease results in the loss of the bone that supports the teeth. In people who have lost a lot of bone, the teeth can become loose. This movement can result in gaps between the front teeth.

Children may have temporary gaps as their baby teeth fall out. Most of these spaces close as the permanent teeth reach their final positions.

Symptoms
A diastema that occurs because of a mismatch between the teeth and the jaw does not have symptoms. However, spaces caused by a tongue thrust habit or periodontal disease will tend to expand or grow with time. The teeth may become loose, and discomfort or pain may occur, particularly during biting or chewing.

Diagnosis
You may notice a space when brushing or flossing. Your dentist can see spaces during an examination.

Expected Duration
If the gap was caused by a mismatch between the permanent teeth and the jaw size, the spaces can be expected to remain throughout life.

Gaps caused by a tongue thrust habit or periodontal disease can get larger with time.

Prevention
Not all spaces can be prevented. For example, if the reason for a space is a missing tooth or a mismatch between the teeth and the jaw size, the spaces cannot be prevented without treatment.

Maintaining your gum health is essential to good oral health. Regular flossing and brushing will help to prevent periodontal disease and its related bone loss.

People with a tongue thrust habit can re-learn to swallow by pushing their tongue up against their palate. Breaking this habit can prevent widening of the spaces between teeth.

Treatment
Sometimes, a diastema is part of a set of problems that require orthodontic treatment. In other cases, a diastema is the only problem. However, some people may seek treatment for reasons of appearance.

Some people get braces, which move the teeth together. Often, no matter where the diastema is, you must wear a full set of braces — on both your upper and lower teeth. That's because moving any teeth affects your entire mouth.

If your lateral incisors are too small, your dentist may suggest widening them using crowns, veneers or bonding.

If you have a space because you are missing teeth, you might need more extensive dental repair. This might include dental implants, a bridge or a partial denture.

If a large labial frenum is causing the gap, the frenum can be reduced through surgery called a frenectomy.

If a frenectomy is done in a younger child, the space may close on its own. If it is done in an older child or an adult, the space may need to be closed with braces.

If the gap is caused by periodontal disease, then periodontal treatment by a dentist or gum specialist (periodontist) is necessary. When gum health is restored, in many cases braces can be used to move the teeth into place. A splint can be used to attach teeth to other teeth and prevent them from moving again. In some cases, a bridge will be required to close the spaces.

When To Call a Professional
If you have a space between your teeth or see one in your child's mouth, talk with your dentist. He or she will determine the reason for the space and may refer you to an orthodontist, a specialist in treatment with braces. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that children be evaluated by an orthodontist by age 7. Treatment (if needed) may not begin right away. You and the orthodontist will discuss the overall treatment plan.

If your space is the result of periodontal disease, your dentist may refer you to a periodontist.

Prognosis
If a diastema is closed through orthodontics or dental repair, the space will tend to stay closed. However, to help prevent the space from coming back, wear your retainers as directed by your orthodontist. Your orthodontist may also splint (attach) the backs of the teeth to other teeth with composite (plastic) and a wire to prevent them from moving. Learn more about tooth whitening here.

The above article is from colgate.com

Sheboygan Dental Care
Robert W. Schoenenberger, DDS
2202 Indiana Avenue
Sheboygan, WI 53081
(920) 452-8042
DentistSheboygan.com

Saturday, 15 August 2020

Dental Emergency

Accidents happen, and knowing what to do when one occurs can mean the difference between saving and losing a tooth.

Here are some tips for common dental emergencies: 
  • For a knocked-out permanent or adult tooth, keep it moist at all times. If you can, try placing the tooth back in the socket without touching the root. If that’s not possible, place it in between your cheek and gums, in milk, or use a tooth preservation product that has the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Then, get to your dentist’s office right away. 
  • For a cracked tooth, immediately rinse the mouth with warm water to clean the area. Put cold compresses on the face to keep any swelling down. 
  • If you bite your tongue or lip, clean the area gently with water and apply a cold compress. 
  • For toothaches, rinse the mouth with warm water to clean it out. Gently use dental floss to remove any food caught between the teeth. Do not put aspirin on the aching tooth or gum tissues. 
  • For objects stuck in the mouth, try to gently remove with floss but do not try to remove it with sharp or pointed instruments. 
When you have a dental emergency, it’s important to visit your dentist or an emergency room as soon as possible.

Here are some simple precautions you can take to avoid accident and injury to the teeth:   
  • Wear a mouthguard when participating in sports or recreational activities. 
  • Avoid chewing ice, popcorn kernels and hard candy, all of which can crack a tooth. 
  • Use scissors, NEVER your teeth, to cut things. 
Most dentists reserve time in their daily schedules for emergency patients. Call your dentist and provide as much detail as possible about your condition.

The above article is from mouthhealthy.org

Sheboygan Dental Care
Robert W. Schoenenberger, DDS
2202 Indiana Avenue
Sheboygan, WI 53081
(920) 452-8042
DentistSheboygan.com

Thursday, 6 August 2020

What to Do About Chipped Baby Teeth?

Children are naturally rambunctious with all their high-energy antics such as running, jumping, diving, or just biting down too hard on something. It goes without saying that a chipped baby tooth is a common experience during these early stages, especially a chipped front tooth.

If your child chips his or her tooth, don’t panic. Unless your child is in pain, a chipped baby tooth is usually nothing serious. Nevertheless, when a chipped tooth does occur, it’s wise to call the dentist and schedule an appointment. Because the sooner you deal with the problem, the better. After all, sometimes your child may not even realize what just happened, and there may be damage that you can’t see.

Chipped Baby Tooth Repair
There are many ways to deal with a chipped tooth and it’s worth reiterating that you should always see a dentist as soon as possible after the event, no matter how severe. A chipped tooth can cause pain and discomfort when chewing or when exposed to very hot or cold temperatures. Below is a list of methods on how best to deal with a chipped tooth.
  • Stay calm: Chipping a tooth is a common thing among children. When such an event happens, there’s no need for alarm. Also remember not to make your child feel self-conscious about their chipped tooth, even if it’s noticeable.
  • Check your child: You’ll want to check and see if your child is in pain or crying. Also check for blood.
  • Call the dentist: Remaining calm, explain what happened and follow any instructions your dentist may give you before scheduling an appointment.
  • Rinse / cold compress: Aside from calling the dentist, you’ll want to rinse your child’s mouth with cold water and apply a cold compress to reduce any potential swelling. You’ll also want to collect any teeth fragments from the scene of the accident and bring them to your dentist. In a case where you cannot find any teeth fragments and your child is having difficulty breathing, immediately take them to an emergency room to make sure they didn’t inhale any teeth fragments.
  • Pain relief: If your child continues to feel pain after the event, an advised amount of children’s ibuprofen is appropriate. If you are not sure, ask your dentist or doctor what the correct dosage before administering any medication.
  • Keep an eye on it: In some cases, the damage from the lost tooth will become visible later, such as a chipped baby tooth turning grey. Also make sure their gums do not become infected.
While it’s never fun when your child gets a chipped tooth, sometimes these things happen, and having a plan is essential in such an event.

The above article is from crest.com
Sheboygan Dental Care
Robert W. Schoenenberger, DDS
2202 Indiana Avenue
Sheboygan, WI 53081
(920) 452-8042
DentistSheboygan.com

Friday, 24 July 2020

Tooth Pain and Sensitivity Before or After Filling Cavities

If you have cavity symptoms, you may have pain in your teeth or in your gums. Cavity pain relief depends on the extent of your tooth decay. Regardless if your cavity symptoms are mild or severe, you should visit your dentist as you may need a filling.

Tooth Fillings for Cavity Pain Relief
Dental fillings are among the most common ways to relieve cavity pain. Here’s a basic overview of cavity pain relief with a dental filling:

  • Numbness: The first thing the dentist will do is numb the area of the cavity.
  • Cleaning: Once the area is numb, the dentist removes the decayed part of the tooth.
  • Filling: The final step in cavity pain relief—the dentist places a filling made from the material of your choice.

Causes of Tooth Pain After Fillings
Fillings are used to replace the decayed area of a tooth, reducing the pain associated with the cavity itself. But tooth pain after filling a tooth is not unusual. Some common reasons for tooth pain after a filling include:

  • Tooth sensitivity: A tooth that has just had a filling placed will be more sensitive to hot foods and cold foods, air temperature, and the pressure of biting. This type of tooth pain after filling a cavity should resolve within a few weeks. If not, contact your dentist.
  • Cracked or loose tooth fillings: Tooth pain after filling a cavity can occur if the filling is not fitting properly to the tooth, or if it develops cracks. If you suspect that your tooth pain is caused by a cracked or ill-fitting filling, contact your dentist.
  • Allergic reaction to tooth fillings: Some people have allergic reactions to the material used for their fillings, such as silver. To help avoid tooth pain after filling a cavity, be sure to tell your dentist about any allergies when discussing your filling choices.

Tooth Filling Pain Relief
You can reduce your risk of tooth pain after filling a cavity by avoiding common sensitive teeth triggers, including very hot or cold foods. In addition, toothpaste designed for sensitive teeth can help minimize the possible sensitivity and tooth pain after filling a cavity. Crest Gum and Sensitivity oral care products are formulated to help relieve the pain associated with sensitivity fast while offering additional protection against food and drinks that cause sensitivity.

If you have cavity symptoms, you may have pain in your teeth or in your gums. Cavity pain relief depends on the extent of your tooth decay. Regardless if your cavity symptoms are mild or severe, you should visit your dentist as you may need a filling.

When you have a dental procedure, you may experience sore teeth afterward. Sore teeth are common after many dental procedures, whether it is something as simple as a cavity filling or as complicated as gum surgery.

Sore Teeth After Filling
Whether you suffer from short-term sore teeth after receiving a filling or long-term sensitive teeth, it is important to follow a complete oral care routine. The Crest Pro-Health Sensitive Shield collection of products can help keep sore teeth clean and healthy, with a toothpaste designed to protect your sensitive teeth.


The above article is from crest.com 
Sheboygan Dental Care
Robert W. Schoenenberger, DDS
2202 Indiana Avenue
Sheboygan, WI 53081
(920) 452-8042
DentistSheboygan.com

Wednesday, 15 July 2020

Dentures

Dentures are removable appliances that can replace missing teeth and help restore your smile. If you’ve lost all of your natural teeth, whether from gum disease, tooth decay or injury, replacing missing teeth will benefit your appearance and your health. That’s because dentures make it easier to eat and speak better than you could without teeth—things that people often take for granted.

When you lose all of your teeth, facial muscles can sag, making you look older. Dentures can help fill out the appearance of your face and profile. They can be made to closely resemble your natural teeth so that your appearance does not change much. Dentures may even improve the look of your smile.

Types of dentures:

  • Conventional. This full removable denture is made and placed in your mouth after the remaining teeth are removed and tissues have healed, which may take several months. 
  • Immediate. This removable denture is inserted on the same day that the remaining teeth are removed. Your dentist will take measurements and make models of your jaw during a preliminary visit. You don’t have to be without teeth during the healing period, but may need to have the denture relined or remade after your jaw has healed. 
  • Overdenture. Sometimes some of your teeth can be saved to preserve your jawbone and provide stability and support for the denture. An overdenture fits over a small number of remaining natural teeth after they have been prepared by your dentist. Implants can serve the same function, too. 

New dentures may feel awkward for a few weeks until you become accustomed to them. The dentures may feel loose while the muscles of your cheek and tongue learn to keep them in place. It is not unusual to experience minor irritation or soreness. You may find that saliva flow temporarily increases. As your mouth becomes accustomed to the dentures, these problems should go away. Follow-up appointments with the dentist are generally needed after a denture is inserted so the fit can be checked and adjusted. If any problem persists, particularly irritation or soreness, be sure to consult your dentist.

Even if you wear full dentures, you still have to practice good dental hygiene. Brush your gums, tongue and roof of your mouth every morning with a soft-bristled brush before you insert your dentures to stimulate circulation in your tissues and help remove plaque.

Like your teeth, your dentures should be brushed daily to remove food particles and plaque. Brushing also can help keep the teeth from staining. 

  • Rinse your dentures before brushing to remove any loose food or debris. 
  • Use a soft bristle toothbrush and a non-abrasive cleanser to gently brush all the surfaces of the dentures so they don't get scratched.
  • When brushing, clean your mouth thoroughly—including your gums, cheeks, roof of your mouth and tongue to remove any plaque. This can help reduce the risk of oral irritation and bad breath. 
  • When you’re not wearing your dentures, put them in a safe place covered in water to keep them from warping. 

Occasionally, denture wearers may use adhesives. Adhesives come in many forms: creams, powders, pads/wafers, strips or liquids. If you use one of these products, read the instructions, and use them exactly as directed. Your dentist can recommend appropriate cleansers and adhesives; look for products with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Products with the ADA Seal have been evaluated for safety and effectiveness.

If you have any questions about your dentures, or if they stop fitting well or become damaged, contact your dentist. Be sure to schedule regular dental checkups, too. The dentist will examine your mouth to see if your dentures continue to fit properly.

The above article is from mouthhealthy.org

Sheboygan Dental Care
Robert W. Schoenenberger, DDS
2202 Indiana Avenue
Sheboygan, WI 53081
(920) 452-8042
DentistSheboygan.com